Open source needs open security

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Experts at Computer Weekly are hailing cybersecurity as the “next frontier” for the open source development model. A spokesperson for IBM Security reaffirmed the point, stating that cybersecurity will improve visibility and bring different silos together. Vice President of IBM Justin Youngblood said most IT environments were “dotted with security tools that protect a plethora of workloads on the cloud”, which could overwhelm teams.

UK healthcare suppliers to receive cybersecurity funding

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The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has announced that UK healthcare businesses will be invited to receive free cyber certification and training. As part of London Tech Week, Digital Infrastructure Minister Matt Warman said that hundreds of businesses would benefit from the scheme, which is funded by a £500,000 government grant. Training will include updating all devices, installing firewalls and managing user access. Warman added: “I urge all organisations to sign up to the government’s Cyber Essentials programme which contains a number of simple steps firms can take to get the fundamentals of good cybersecurity in place.”   

Experts predict growth for password policy enforcement

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A new report has revealed predictions for the growth of global password policy enforcement software. The Global Password Policy Enforcement Market report states that we will see significant growth in this field by the year 2026. In particular, the study focused on production, consumption, manufacturing and sales. It also analyses crucial market dynamics including drivers, restraints, trends and opportunities. The full report is available online now.

NHS branch awarded international security standard

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The NHS Greater Manchester Shared Services has received the international information security standard ISO 27001. This is one of the first NHS organisations to receive such a prestigious information security standard, demonstrating their dedication to protecting customer and patient information from a wide range of cyber threats. IT Security Manager Phil Scott said: “There have been a number of major data breaches in the healthcare industry, which highlighted the vulnerability of the NHS to cyber-attacks. We wanted to reassure our customers that we are committed to keeping data safe and leading the way in cybersecurity, so ISO 27001 certification was the clear choice.”   

Parents urged to be wary of videogame hackers

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A new report by the Wall Street Journal has revealed that children’s video game accounts such as Steam are being targeted by hackers. These cyber attackers are seemingly able to spend money on accounts which have no cash pre-loaded onto them. Parents are advised to read the terms of services to check up on individual security policies, as well as checking Wi-Fi security and never playing on a public internet connection.

Ethical hacking course receives certification

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Abertay University in Scotland has been given the sign off to offer a postgraduate course in ethical hacking. The National Cyber Security Centre has approved the MSc Ethical Hacking and Cybersecurity course, helping students to combat hackers, and understand digital forensics and malware analysis. The programme will evolve in line with changing cybersecurity needs.  

Cognitive hacking has power like “never before”

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A new age of hacking is upon on us, this time focusing on digitally crafted propaganda. With sites such as TikTok offering worldwide influence, AI-powered bots could be taking over to spread harmful or even political messages. Experts are concerned about social conditioning, referencing cases such as the Chinese Communist Party’s influence on Chinese social media platform TikTok. They also warn that foreign presidential campaigns could be “destabilised”.   

New cybersecurity opportunities for rail industry

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The railway cybersecurity market is expected to grow by 8.2 per cent to reach more than $11 million by 2027. Digital transformation is said to be “leading the way” according to reports from the Railway Cybersecurity Market Forecast to 2027 global analysis. Common areas for digitisation are train control, maintenance monitoring, signalling control, passenger information systems and video protection. Railways are becoming increasingly vulnerable to cyber-attacks as a result.

More than 60,000 attacks taking place daily

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New reports suggest that UK SMEs are suffering from 65,000 cybersecurity attacks per day, with 4,500 classed as “successful”. It has also been suggested that these figures could be much higher in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. In a report by Robert Walters and data provider Vacancysoft, it was revealed that data breaches could cost up to £2.48 million per incident, and 48 per cent of UK companies do not have sufficient security to support remote working.   

“Unbreakable” quantum IDs are the future

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Cybersecurity experts at Forbes are suggesting that new quantum IDs could replace passwords in the future. Containing 1,000 trillion atoms, the IDs are said to be far more reliable than passwords, QR codes and holograms. Lancaster University start-up Quantum Base is currently investigating the technology, and claim that it would take 13 billion years to clone. There are potentially already applications for large-scale manufacturing.