Three quarters of companies to accelerate digital

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Fortune has surveyed the CEOs of the 2020 Fortune 500 list to get their views on life after COVID-19. While more than a quarter said they would “never return to their usual workplace”, an astonishing three quarters said that the crisis will accelerate the pace of technological transformation. Cybersecurity is one of the biggest considerations, particularly for those working from home at this time.  

Remote security working “undermines collaboration”

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Cybersecurity experts are warning that remote work “may not be a good idea” for security teams. Corey Thomas, CEO and chairman of security firm Rapid7, says that security teams that work from home cannot communicate as effectively, nor can they share skills and perform as well as they could in person. He says that while remote working has taught us new skills, we should not underestimate the value of communication for business safety.   

Most vulnerable countries revealed in new survey

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The Cybersecurity Exposure Index 2020 has revealed the countries most susceptible to cyber-attacks. After analysing 108 countries in Europe, America, Asia-Pacific and Africa, the team revealed that Africa has the highest exposure score, with three quarters in the high-risk category. Asia-Pacific had 60% in the high-risk category, while Europe and North America were much safer. Finland topped the ranks for least vulnerable country.

Cybersecurity to become a much deeper legal issue

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Legal departments are preparing to become much more involved with cybersecurity issues as the global workforce continues to work from home. They will be re-evaluating privacy and data protection, while also addressing how they protect their networks. Experts at Law.com warned, however, that many legal departments were “not ready” for the workloads coming towards them as a result of the shift towards remote working.   

World’s popular passwords can be “cracked in under a second”

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Account holders are urged to update their weak passwords to something stronger as it was revealed that brute force hackers can guess the majority of popular passwords in less than one second. Up to 70% were labelled as vulnerable, with consecutive numbers 12345 named as the most popular. Users should turn towards a decentralised password manager instead to protect themselves from these brute force methods.  

ENTERPRISES URGED TO ENFORCE PASSWORD POLICIES

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In the wake of World Password Day, professionals are being advised to enforce password policies across all workspaces. Lax attitudes towards password security are making things easier for hackers, who are using more sophisticated technology than ever to guess users’ personal details. Stephen Bowers, Global Practice Director at BSI, suggests using a password manager rather than changing every 30 days.

‘ONE ATTACK EVERY MINUTE’ FOR UK BUSINESSES IN Q1

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Cybersecurity attacks were up by 30 per cent in Q1 of 2020, says a new report. There were 157,000 cyber-attacks says internet service provider Beaming – up from 120,000 in 2019. Experts think there could be a link between the coronavirus crisis and the increase in attacks. Businesses most likely to suffer from attacks included those that relied on IoT applications, as well as company databases and file-sharing systems.   

COVID-19 ACCELERATES NEED FOR SECURITY

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Experts at GlobalData say the need for investment in cybersecurity is stronger than ever, in light of the coronavirus crisis. In particular, data is a key issue. Jonathan Cordwell, Principal Health and Social Care Analyst at GlobalData, says: “ Health Secretary Matt Hancock has been directly involved in relaxing these policies, such as granting Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) powers to obtain information from NHS IT systems and issuing orders to healthcare providers to process confidential patient information relating to the coronavirus.”

ONE FIFTH OF US ADMIT TO SHARING PASSWORDS WITH CHILDREN

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Remote working continues to pose a threat as employees across Europe admit to their own bad cybersecurity practices. A survey carried out by OneLogin revealed that 17 per cent of workers share their work device password with their children, while 36 per cent had not changed their WiFi password in over a year. The figures were even worse in the UK, where 50 per cent admitted to this flaw. On the plus side, 70 per cent of UK businesses are using VPNs.   

UK TRANSPORT SECTOR URGENTLY NEEDS A SECURITY CENTRE

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Academics have come together to posit a new ‘Centre of Excellence’ to promote good security practices within the UK transport sector. A study into autonomous vehicles, led by ResiCAV, highlighted key flaws in national road transport. With input from universities, local councils and the National Digital Exploitation Centre, the proposed three-month programme has been supported by government funding including Innovate UK.